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. >> next a look at the fbi and its role in investigating cyber related crimes. from this morning's "washington journal" this is about 45 minutes. >> this week's segment involving your money will look at the fbi's role in fighting cyber crimes. and we are talking about-based terrorism, espionage. computer intrusions, major cyber fraud. will learn a little bit, then we will get to your calls and will learn a little bit first from shawn henry, who was the fbi's executive director for criminal and cyber programs. and been in a peer for quite a number of years by thank you for joining us. >> thanks are having. spent first of all what exactly is a cybercrime? >> when you talk about cyber, i think danger to any type of criminal activity that involves the use of the computer i think that's what most people talk about. when i talk about cybercrime on focusing on intrusions into computer networks. so those networks that we all use every single day come to increase efficiency and effectiveness in and our productivity. but those very same things that make those networks were effective for us
in the u.s. to be detained without charge or trial. the f.b.i. and other law enforcement agencies have proven time and time again that they are up to the challenge of detecting, stopping, arresting and convicting terrorists found on u.s. soil. having successly arrested, -- successfully detained, arrested, convicted hundreds of these heinous people both before and after 9/11. for example, since january, 2009, 98 individuals have been successfully arrested inside the united states by the f.b.i. and other federal or local law enforcement officers on terrorism-related charges. last month, staff of the senate intelligence committee compiled a list of the 95 individuals arrested in the past four years as part of more than 50 different terrorism investigations. the list was based on publicly available information from the f.b.i., the congressional research service and media reports. and i have it here and i would like to enter that list into the record. the presiding officer: without objection. mrs. feinstein: thank you very much. it is also important to understand that suspected terrorists w
recollection. i just don't have a recollection of this. it's fascinating, and ex-fbi agent named james brosnahan, who actually spoke to for this the. i called him a. he was a great witness for the opposition because he had been the fbi agent that had been called to the scene in phoenix in 1960s in the election when william rehnquist was interfering with voters. he was a very well-known and respected respected lawyer by 10 in san francisco. brosnahan said of his day. i was the fbi agent on the scene. identify him as the man. it was discouraging but voters. rehnquist was giving them a test, which was not illegal, but he was really pushing the line to the point where the police and fbi had to be called to restore order. and rehnquist simply said that was not me. >> host: kind of a mistaken identity. so james brosnahan comes and puts a lot on the line. >> guest: and really kind of just gets hammered because he's not let that anything that he can grab onto to come back. he just says they can't explain it. it's just not me. i was very, i thought kg. very typical when i met with rehnquist 10
finance, has meant by this gem smuggling operation. in fact, what they later found out that the fbi and cia were some of those have even showed up in shame shops in arizona. so you will find these gems to finance this whole campaign. again gordon back to this was the valley, the captain on the two new tactic with the plan was flawed. but even though the news that it was flawed, and that there was incredible danger and they would have to climb to the top of the mountain to get to this compound with a new it was surrounded by some of that, you know, some of the best mercenary so to speak at what really trained mercenaries were fighting for that 10 years. they still went and they still went to carry out this mission. i think you can describe a little bit of what happened when they went. >> okay, so they take off on the border of jalalabad and fly into this valley. there is some concern at this point obviously. there's concerned about the welfare comment there's a certain when that they could get in before the cloud cover can. they had to work quickly as well
various leading government officials up there all back that up, including director of the fbi. i'm paraphrasing, but he said these two categories of companies. those that have been compromised and will be gorgeous so delicate. so that's the shocking statistics to take. it is not uncommon for a credit card company to come back to emerge it and say hey, our threat vector detection system is more sophisticated than yours. we are picking up some indications he been compromised. here's what you need to look at. some recent examples of some very high profile and public incidents that have occurred recently. rsa, the cybersecurity company files was breached in 2011 and that led to a number of other breaches because their systems are used by many companies to provide this company's own security systems. in addition, there is a classic financial crimes case involving sony. i think that one of the takeaways from these examples is that these are not -- these are companies technologically sophisticated pressure in the cyberworld and they themselves were reached. so these are wal-marts for co
more problematic. i think one of the other panelists mentioned this quote from fbi director, and you see the same concerns of talking about in the commercial sphere, to. he said basically set to every company is being hacked one way or another and it's not a question of when they will be hacked. it will be a question of when it will happen again. that might be a pessimistic view of how bitter cybersecurity sector can be. it is certainly a theme you see in the space. my only point, the only other point i want to make on commercial data is that you see and report. there was a report issued by verizon about data breach investigation, that suggests that a lease in endears large numbers of serious cyber intrusions intrusions have been aimed at create taking authentication credential, passwords, usernames, things like that. things that can be used for later inclusion's in the future, things that might give an intruder broader access to a network. so i'd like to shift for a moment, those ideas in mind, and talk about offense of cyber operations. and what do we mean by that and what is, what
was crawling with fbi agents. everybody knew because they were wearing tweed jackets. a terrible thing to wear in santa fe. some real serious espionage went on. that is great drama. i went to santa fe to walk around the streets that characters walk around. i find that very hopeful. >> i wondered when i came to buffalo with a you had gone to buffalo. >> oh yes. a couple times i have been to buffalo. the other thing is buffalo features heavily in the first book, and 1 hundred years ago was a very different place from what it is like today. nevertheless i went and looked around but i got ahold of old maps, the buffalo blue book which was the list of high society people in town, got newspapers that were published in newspapers published at the time and walking around is never enough, but it is a good basis. >> gives you a feel for the place. in doing research, it is one thing if you do your research but are you able to do your own research in a book like this that covers so much? >> i have to do it. other people wouldn't know what i was looking for. i do have helped in finding stuff. i use a resea
agencies who carry firearms in the government. i don't mind the police or the fbi, well, the department of agricultural has a swat team. the fish and wildlife have a swat team. they raided gibson guitar with guns drawn, took their computer equipment. when they accused them of something which was breaking a foreign regulation. a law in india they were accused of breaking and penalized in the u.s. for breaking a law in the india. those are the kind of stories we write about. >> how come we haven't heard about that before? >> some of them you have heard. one the case of john and judy. they were selling bun anies in missouri. they fined $95,000 for having a wrong permit. the government said you can pay on the website. if you don't pay in thirty days you'll owe $3.1 billion. it's the kind of stuff the government is doing to bully people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they're doing the same with confiscating people's land and saying you can't build on it because it's a wetland. even though there isn't a pond or stream on the land. >> as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >>
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8